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The best Hotels, Restaurants, Music, Art, andCultural Attractions to see in Detroit, Michigan.

HOTELS: DETROIT

Stay at MGM Grand Detroit, located only 20 minutes from the airport and right in the downtown area. 
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Book a room at the Inn on Ferry Street’s Owen House, where you can tickle the ivories on the baby grand piano in the parlor. 
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Spend the night in room 3C—decorated in the mid-century modern style with George Nelson fixtures—at the Inn at 97 Winder. 
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Spend extra time in the area by overnighting at the historic Dearborn Inn. 
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RESTAURANTS: DETROIT

Fuel up for the day with a half-pound burger and sweet potato fries at the Majestic Café.
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To get a taste of authentic Arabian culture, make your way to New Yasmeen Bakery in Dearborn—less than 10 miles from downtown Detroit. The family-run bakery produces distinctive breads to sell nationwide while also running a 100-seat self-serve café. One end of the building features a dining area adorned with murals of life in Lebanon. Check out the food displays with cases of dishes like chicken with garlic sauce, stuffed eggplant, and pies filled with spinach and meat. Try shoumar—cracked wheat with dill—and save room for cannolis, baklava, and pistachio squares topped with syrup. 
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Try the local favorite hanneth (lamb with rice) at Yemeni eatery Arabian Village. 313-841-2550

Dine on Detroit strip steak at the Whitney, former home of lumber baron David Whitney Jr. who supplied wood for car parts. 
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MUSIC: DETROIT

For decades, Detroit ranked as one of the top spots in the country for producing and hosting top jazz talent. That legacy lives on today at Baker’s Keyboard Lounge. The legendary spot claims to be the longest running jazz club in the world at 74 years and counting. All the big names—from Fats Waller to Nancy Wilson to John Coltrane—have played here. Today the art deco-style club seats about 100 at cozy booths and tables surrounding the stage, home to a 7-foot Steinway piano handpicked by Art Tatum. There’s not a bad seat in the house, but try to get a two-top table at the foot of the stage to get close to the action. Or hang out at the trademark piano-shaped bar with faux keys. No matter where you sit, come hungry for soul food like catfish, short ribs, and black-eyed peas. Drinks run the gamut from bottles of Budweiser to the trendiest martinis.
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Dig into tapas at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café in Grosse Pointe Farms. The owner started local jazz label Mack Avenue Records. 
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Visit the studio where legends like Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder created a new sound at the Motown Historical Museum. 
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ART: DETROIT

Explore the area’s cutting-edge art at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit’sConsidering Detroit exhibit, running now through July 28. 
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HISTORIC/CULTURAL: DETROIT

The Heidelberg Project on Detroit’s East Side features two city blocks of polka-dotted houses, trees hung with stuffed animals, and old shoes arranged as sculptures. When Tyree Guyton returned to Heidelberg Street after living in Oklahoma, he barely recognized the city of his youth. Encouraged and helped by his grandfather, the artist, his ex-wife, and neighborhood kids took paintbrushes to the blight in 1986. They turned artless lots into “lots of art.” Tour the exteriors of eight houses and more than 50 exhibits by car or foot. (Purchase a map that explains the artwork on the Heidelberg website or at the stand on Heidelberg Street during the summer.) You’ll see the “Dotty Wotty Mobile,” an old car covered in polka dots and stuffed animals; “Faces in the Hood,” abandoned car hoods throughout the project painted with self-portraits; and most famous, the “Dotty Wotty House,” which Guyton’s family owns. 
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Do the dabke—the traditional folk dance of Lebanon—during the Arab International Festival from June 20 to June 22. 
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Learn about the roadster that first gave wheels to the common man at the 1904-built Ford Piquette Avenue Plant. Now dubbed the Model T Automotive Heritage Complex and nicknamed T-Plex, the plant is the only example of an early Detroit auto factory open to visitors—and only on the first and third Saturdays from May through October (or arrange in advance for a group tour on any day). The 67,000-square-foot plant looks much as it did a century ago. You’ll see the scuffed wooden floors where workers built the first 12,000 Model Ts. Take the same stairs that Ford and associates like Harvey S. Firestone took to the third floor. An exhibit shows a stationary assembly line where the workers, not the cars, moved. The men set up the frame and added the drive train before attaching seats and gas lamps in stall-like bays.
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Watch the F-150 come together on the modern assembly line at the Ford Rouge Factory Tour. 
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Check out GM vehicles, from vintage to concept, at the 50,000-square-foot showroom surrounding the Detroit Marriott. 
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